Posts Tagged: five hundred kingdoms

Reading notes, week 30

July 25: Beauty and the Werewolf (Five Hundred Kingdoms #6) by Mercedes Lackey. Which concludes this round of Five Hundred Kingdoms reread. I do wish there was more because it’s such an interesting concept, the power of stories as a real power in the world with guardians to make sure it doesn’t get out of

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Reading notes, week 28

July 10: Fortune’s Fool by Mercedes Lackey (Five Hundred Kingdoms #3). Much more disjointed (several different stories) than I remember; I’d almost wish she’d stuck to the main story, which has more than enough meat for a whole book. But I do like the little preliminaries too. Full of wonderful people! Bechdel test pass (unless

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Reading notes, week 4

January 29: Beauty and the Werewolf by Mercedes Lackey. Last of the Five Hundred Kingdoms, alas. I love it that the protagonist and the love interest are friends long before there’s a romance. But the villain is so blatant that I thought for a while that he’d turn out to be a good guy after

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Reading notes, week 3

January 18: Princess Hynchatti and Some Other Surprises by Tanith Lee. In (as far as I can see) excellent Dutch translation. I bought the book when I was a teenager and the local remainders bookshop had it for 1 guilder. (This is also how I first encountered Diana Wynne Jones, though those translations are much

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Reading notes, week 2

January 15: One Good Knight by Mercedes Lackey. Apparently after last week’s Agatha Christie spree I’m now on a Five Hundred Kingdoms spree. (And so is spouse, though she’s two books ahead of me). I do wish they weren’t quite¬†so heteronormative. (When the princess finds out the knight is a woman, she says “I guess

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Reading notes, week 21

May 22: Harvest Moon, three separate fantasy novellas all having to do with the (full) moon. The first is by Mercedes Lackey, a story about (among others) Leopold and his bride from The Sleeping Beauty having a run-in with the Greek Olympic gods. Second, by Michelle Sagara, in a world I didn’t know yet. Hard

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