Posts Tagged: (in)visible religion

Rereading When Voiha Wakes

Joy Chant, When Voiha Wakes I first read this when it came out, in 1983, when I was young and foolish impressionable. Also, I had little use for men at the time, making the female-dominated society in the book seem natural and desirable. In short (the review, on the title link, has much more information):

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Rereading Het pierement achter de woonwagen

C.E. Pothast-Gimberg, Het pierement achter de woonwagen (The street organ behind the wagon) Another of those books from my childhood that can only be found on second-hand-nostalgic-books sites, and very much in passing on academic and slightly academic children’s literature sites. I remember first reading it at the house of a friend of my parents,

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Joining the choir

Of people who say yes to gay YA (original link gone, 2018), that is. Together with Seanan McGuire, Green Knight, Zeborah and Swan Tower and countless other people who don’t happen to be in my RSS feed or to get linked by people who are. It’s even made the Dutch media, at least the faintly

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Rereading De brief voor de koning

Tonke Dragt, De brief voor de koning (The letter for the king) Another favourite book from my preteens and teens– perhaps a bit later than Ilja de kleine ganzenridder. It strikes me, now that I read it again after twenty years or so of Valdyas just as we’re having a bit of campaign with a

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Rereading De torens van februari

Tonke Dragt, De torens van februari (The towers of February) At last, a book that other people have written actual text about. It seems to have been wildly popular when it came out in 1973. I must admit that I’m one of the many people who sent the author fan mail about it (and got

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Rereading De gestolen ikoon

Attie Leijnse, De gestolen ikoon (The stolen icon) Not a single link that isn’t “buy this book here second-hand” or “I have this in my (historical) collection”. That is to say, only bibliographic information, nothing about the content. Serves me right for reading obscure books, probably. This is actually rather well written for a 1960s

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Issues

Since I wrote about Ilja, de kleine ganzenridder I’ve been wondering why so few children’s books have religion (or its trappings, like going to church, celebrating feasts, or even prayer) as a normal part of the background. It’s easy to say “because religion isn’t a normal part of life any more” but I’ve read lots

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