Posts Tagged: mystery

Reading notes, week 7

Added a “Next up” section. I won’t list DNFs unless it’s a spectacular DNF with a reason, not just books I abandon because I feel more like reading something else. This is intended to make me persevere with the reading notes without thinking it means I have to either finish or justify not finishing everything

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Reading notes, week 5

February 1: The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander, because of this post on Tor.com. I had my very badly converted epub open in calibre’s edit mode and fixed each chapter while/before reading. Now I want to read the others as well but I might wait a couple of days if they need fixing too.

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Reading notes, week 4

January 25: Tales from Perach (reread) by Shira Glassman, because something that happened in A Harvest of Ripe Figs made something in one of the stories much clearer. January 25: A Harvest of Ripe Figs by Shira Glassman. I bought the two Mangoverse books I didn’t have yet and don’t want to stop after The

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Reading notes, week 3

By now we all know it’s 2020, don’t we? January 18: Simon Hawke, The Slaying of the Shrew. I was on the train and quickly wanted something to read without a lot of scrolling through the list and the burden of choice. It’s got the same advantages and disadvantages as #1: not spectacularly good but

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2020 reading notes, week 1

Sara had a splendid idea, and this is my modified version of it: I’m starting now, January 1, and updating the post whenever I finish reading something (fiction or nonfiction, any length, new or rereads; no blog posts but notable articles may slip in), keeping the newest on top so people following it won’t have

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Rereading Miss Marple

I’ve been on a Miss Marple binge, but now I’m satiated before the end. It started when I opened a random Miss Marple (8, The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side, because I couldn’t remember ever having read it) and noticed that it referred strongly to The Murder at the Vicarage. I knew I disliked

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Rereading Passenger to Frankfurt

Agatha Christie, Passenger to Frankfurt I wonder why there’s a pack of dynamite on the cover of the edition we have, because while there’s a lot of explosive stuff going on (especially in interpersonal relations) there aren’t any actual explosions, at least not in the foreground. I must have finished this the first time around,

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